@IASLC STARS program statement about #coronavirus and #COVID19

The IASLC STARS program develops new patient research advocates (PRAs) to help accelerate lung cancer research. You’ll find program info and PRA and Mentor applications at https://www.iaslc.org/Research-Education/Supportive-Training-for-Advocates-in-Research-and-Science-STARS>https://www.iaslc.org/Research-Education/Supportive-Training-for-Advocates-in-Research-and-Science-STARS.

We encourage you to apply by March 16!

Be sure to read the Guidelines and FAQs before applying. They contain useful information you’ll need to make a strong application.

The program is making contingency plans to ensure STARS will happen in some form despite concerns about the novel coronavirus and COVID-19. Here’s the official IASLC statement:

 

PLEASE NOTE A CHANGE IN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS, AS OF 9-MARCH-2020:
Yes, you CAN still apply if you or your loved one has experienced cancer progression recently. The health and safety of the lung cancer community is our top priority. PRAs and Mentors who have or had lung cancer and who are selected for the program will need to provide a letter from their primary lung cancer physician stating that the applicant is in adequate health to travel to Singapore in August 2020 and fully participate in all required STARS activities.

Lung cancer patient and 2019 STARS Mentor Jill Feldman blogged her experience with the program here: https://lungcancer.net/living/stars-program/

Hear more about the IASLC STARS program in this video:

Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer (#TTLC20) 20th Anniversary Meeting — IASLC Podcast

Ever wonder what happens at the annual IASLC Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer (#TTLC20) meeting in Santa Monica, California? To mark the meeting’s 20th Anniversay this week, I chatted with two of the co-chairs, Drs. Paul Bunn and Suresh Ramalingam, on the IASLC “Lung Cancer Considered” podcast. Listen or download here:

Help guide efforts to modernize ClinicalTrials.gov — submit comments by 14-March-2020

ALL HANDS ON DECK! Engaged patients, patient advocates, research advocates:  this means YOU.

Clinicaltrials.gov (the federal website that lists all available clinical trials) is being modernized, and they want to hear from YOU. Please submit your comments and suggestions about the clinical trials submission process, site functionality, data standards, ease of searching, etc by 14-Mar-2020 at https://nlmenterprise.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_e2rLEUAx99myump

A public meeting will be held April 30 to discuss the submissions.

What is an IRB and why should patients care?

Image credit:  This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-ND

Better lung cancer treatment lowers overall cancer death rate–yet stigma persists

STAT News published an article today titled “U.S. cancer death rate drops by largest annual margin ever, report says.” An excerpt says:

The overall cancer death rate has been falling about 1.5% a year since 1991. It fell 2.2% from 2016 to 2017, according to the new American Cancer Society report. That’s the largest drop ever seen in national cancer statistics going back to 1930, said Rebecca Siegel, the lead author.  ‘It’s absolutely driven by lung cancer,’ which accounts for about a quarter of all cancer deaths, she said. Take lung cancer out of the mix, and the 2017 rate drop is 1.4%, she added.

Experts mainly credit advances in treatment. Topping the list are refinements in surgery, better diagnostic scanning, and more precise use of radiation.

They also celebrate the impact of newer drugs. Genetic testing can now identify specific cancer cell mutations, which allow more targeted therapy using newer pharmaceuticals that are a step beyond traditional chemotherapy.

This news reinforces National Cancer Institute (NCI) data published in 2019 that the lung cancer 5-year survival rate rose to 19.4% for all types of lung cancer.  When I was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2011, the 5-year survival rate for lung cancer was only 16%, and the majority of lung cancer patients survived less than one year. As the STAT article says, it has a LOT do with newer lung cancer diagnosis and treatment options. A major contributor is genomic testing of tumors, and the targeted therapies that can inhibit cancer cells driven by altered genes.  Patients on some targeted therapies have a median survival of over five years! About 30% of non-small cell lung cancer patients are currently eligible to take some form of targeted therapy, and that number may soon rise to 50%.

The benefits of targeted therapies have just begun to affect the NCI’s five-year survival stats. The first successful lung cancer targeted therapy clinical trial (crizotinib for ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer) began in 2007, and the drug was approved in 2011. The NCI’s 2019 stats are based on data collected between 2009 and 2015. The survival rate will continue to go up due to approval of more targeted therapies, as well as the advent of immunotherapy (first approved in 2014), more precise radiation treatments, better surgical techniques, and early detection with lung cancer screening. When lung cancer is caught in early stages, 80% of patients are CURABLE.

However, despite obtaining their information from same source (the Associated Press), some media outlets have emphasized different angles of this story. An National Public Radio (NPR) article states, “What’s behind the decline [in cancer deaths]? In part, smoking rates have fallen steadily, which means the biggest risk factor for lung cancer has fallen appreciably. New cancer treatments are also playing a role, Siegel says.” (That’s ALL NPR’s article says about the contribution of better lung cancer treatment to the reduction of cancer deaths).

I wish the media would stop emphasizing smoking cessation as the cure for lung cancer death, instead of the significant advancements lung cancer treatment. Anyone with lungs can get lung cancer. An increasing number of lung cancer cases (currently around 20%) occur in never smokers. While overall lung cancer deaths have been dropping slightly, the death rate in young women who have never smoked is actually RISING. The World Health Organization has acknolwedged that air pollution is a risk factor for lung cancer, as is exposure to radon gas and other environmental exposures.

Crediting smoking cessation as the primary reason for reduction in lung cancer deaths perpetuates stigma, which contributes to worse lung cancer outcomes through physician nihilism, patient anxiety depression, and reduced funding for lung cancer research. Once a person has been diagnosed with a serious disease, they should receive the same compassion and treatment regardless of their personal characteristics. Blaming the patient and telling them to stop smoking never cured anyone.  But it may prevent the patient from experiencing the best possible outcome for their disease. Why won’t the media emphasize very real contribution–and the hope–offered by better lung cancer treatments ?

So, when you see news about the reduction in cancer deaths (and lung cancer in particular), please look past the errant “due primarily to smoking reduction” emphasis.  Focus instead on the hope offered by cancer research and the increasing number of new lung cancer therapies.  We don’t have a lung cancer cure for everyone, but researchers are working on it. Those touched by lung cancer need that hope.

We’re getting better at killing lung cancer.  Stigma is SO much harder to kill.

 

A success with TILs to treat metastatic cancer

More progress in research using the patient’s own unmodified immune system cells (TILs, or tumor infiltrating lymphocytes) to attack their cancer. This is similar to the experimental treatment that science fiction author and friend Jay Lake had at the National Institutes of Health, and is being conducted by the same researcher, Dr Steven A. Rosenberg.

New Immunotherapy Treatment Removes All Tumors In Woman With Advanced Metastatic Breast Cancer

Swimming in federal alphabet soup (SACHRP version)

I’m pleased to share that I’m now officially a federal employee–I’m a newly minted member of HHS OHRP SACHRP.

Say what? Let’s spell out the acronyms.

HHS = US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is an agency of the Executive Branch of the US Government. The Secretary of HHS is a member of the President’s Cabinet. The HHS mission is “to enhance and protect the health and well-being of all Americans.”

OHRP = Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) is part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health in the Office of the Secretary of HHS. OHRP “provides leadership in the protection of the rights, welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in research conducted or supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).”

SACHRP = Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP) “provides expert advice and recommendations to the Secretary of HHS on issues pertaining to the protection of human subjects in research.”

So why does this matter?

I’ll know more about my role after I attend my first meeting in Washington DC at the end of July. I hope to provide a patient perspective on (and hopefully help influence) the conduct and ethics of cancer research and clinical trials. Three potential areas of clinical trials I’d like to see clarified are (1) reimbursement of patient expenses for cancer trial participation, (2) the use of social media during a clinical trial, such as communication between patients in the same trial, and (3) reasonable guidelines to increase patient access to test results generated by their samples and data sharing between research projects.

Below is the official announcement posted this morning on the OHRP listserv. I am one of seven new SACHRP members just appointed to a three-year term. I’m in a pretty accomplished group!

———————————

OHRP wishes to express our sincere appreciation to all nominees who requested consideration for membership on the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protection (SACHRP).

We are pleased to announce the appointment of the following new members:

  1. Mary Ellen Allen, J.D.

Mary Ellen Allen is Assistant General Counsel, Specialist, Healthcare Law Group, at Genentech, Inc. She has extensive experience and expertise in human subject protections and clinical research, including FDA regulations and guidelines, privacy, GCP, compliance, diagnostics and innovation. As Associate General Counsel, Specialist at Genentech she supports the company’s global clinical development programs and provides legal support regarding General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Readiness and implementation, data sharing, and personalized healthcare matters. She is Legal Lead for Roche’s Human Genetics initiatives, including Individual Return of Genomic Results to Study Participants program, and supports the Roche Bioethics organization, including pre-approval and post-trial access to investigational drugs, and am a member of Roche Bioethics Network, Roche Scientific and Ethics Advisory Group Operating Committee, and Roche global Pharma Biorepository Governance Committee.

  1. Jyoti Angal, D.S., MPH

Dr. Angal is the Director of the Regulatory Knowledge Core within the Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health, funded by NIMHD that provides a platform to bring together tribal communities and health researchers from multiple disciplines to work together in the development of cutting-edge transdisciplinary research that will address the significant health disparities experienced by American Indians in South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota. In her role, she provides leadership to tribal partners to establish independent, systematic research review processes, including setting up a tribal research review board. Her interests include building capacity for ensuring the highest standards for human subjects protections. In addition to her position, she provides regulatory oversight for several NIH funded longitudinal research studies. Dr. Angal is also the Director of Clinical Research at Avera Research Institute Center for Pediatric & Community Research, Avera McKennan Hospital and University Health Center, Sioux Falls, SD.

  1. Linda Coleman, JD, CIP, CHC, CHRC, CCEP-I

As the Director of the Yale University Human Research Protection Program, Ms. Coleman serves as the Human Research Protection Administrator for the University and is responsible for the oversight and administration of Yale’s comprehensive Human Research Protection Program, which includes providing administrative and regulatory support for the Yale IRBs, RDRC, and RIDC. In her role, she is responsible for a number of functional duties including, serving as the lead for inquiries regarding audits and inquiries from regulatory agencies and accreditation bodies; assessing HRPP policies and practices for operational efficiency and compliance with applicable laws, guidelines, accreditation standards, and local context requirements; and collaborating with University stakeholders on operational initiatives related to research. Ms. Coleman also serves on several Yale University committees including the Institutional Conflict of Interest Committee, Investigator Conflict of Interest Committee, Institutional Biosafety Committee, Institutional Research Compliance Committee, Data Safety Monitoring Committee, and other committees focused on research policy matters.

  1. Janet Freeman-Daily, MSc, ENG

Janet Freeman-Daily is a stage IV Lung Cancer Survivor and Patient Advocate. In her previous career, Janet was an aerospace systems engineer where, among other things, she learned to be a technical translator.  She now brings that same experience and science to lung cancer via writing, blogging, public speaking, as well as collaborating with other patients, care partners, advocates, healthcare providers and researchers.  Janet is active on social media with her own blogspot, Gray Connections, and is a moderator of #LCSM Chat, promoting ePatient self-advocacy.  When asked what her goal is, Janet says, “I intend to keep advocating for lung cancer patients until I’m out of treatment options and energy.” She is co-founder, The ROS1ders at ros1cancer.com (05/2015-present) and Global ROS1 Initiative, and co-developer and Project Director, Hope with Answers video conversations, in collaboration with Lung Cancer Foundation of America (LCFA) and International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

  1. Robert “Skip” Nelson, M.D., M.Div. Ph.D.

Dr. Nelson is currently Senior Director, Pediatric Drug Development in the Child Health Innovation Leadership Department (CHILD) at Johnson & Johnson. Before joining Johnson & Johnson in January 2018, Dr. Nelson was the Deputy Director and Senior Pediatric Ethicist in the Office of Pediatric Therapeutics at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, providing consultation throughout FDA on clinical and ethical issues arising in the development of FDA-regulated products for children, and serving as a standing member of the internal FDA Pediatric Review Committee. Dr. Nelson was a member and then Chair of the FDA Pediatric Advisory Committee prior to joining FDA in 2006.

  1. Walter L. Straus, M.D., MPH, FACP, FCPP

Dr. Walter Straus is Associate Vice-President and Therapeutic Area Head for Infectious Disease Therapeutics and Vaccines in Global Clinical Safety and Pharmacovigilance at Merck and Co., Inc. In this capacity his team serves as the company’s patient safety steward, and is responsible for overseeing aggregate clinical safety assessment of late stage products in development as well as post-licensure safety monitoring and assessment for all Merck vaccines and infectious disease therapeutics.  During his tenure at Merck, he has been a co-author on corporate policies pertaining to human research protection and corporate responsibility. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research, a member of the Executive Committee of the Harvard Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Network, and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

  1. Consuelo H. Wilkins, MD, MSCI

Consuelo H. Wilkins, MD, MSCI, is the Executive Director of the Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance and Associate Professor of Medicine at both Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Meharry Medical College. Dr. Wilkins is a clinical investigator and engagement researcher who is an Associate Director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Science, where she oversees programs in community engagement and team science. Dr. Wilkins is currently a Principal Investigator of the Vanderbilt-Miami-Meharry Center of Excellence in Precision Medicine and Population Health, which focuses on decreasing disparities among African Americans and Latinos using precision medicine; and the Vanderbilt Recruitment Innovation Center, a national center dedicated to enhancing recruitment and retention in clinical trials. She is widely recognized for her innovative work developing and testing methods and tools to engage patients and communities in research and was recently named director of the Engagement Core of the All of Us Research Program, a national precision medicine project which will enroll a million or more participants.