Lung cancer survival is looking UP — WAY up

This chart from the NCI’s SEER database shows the five-year survival for lung cancer. Note the awesome upward trend.  Survival increased to 19.4% in 2015.

This doesn’t seem like a bit improvement until you think about what it reflects. The year 2015 was only four years after the FDA approved the first targeted therapy for ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (the first of MANY targeted  therapy approvals), and the first year the FDA approved any immunotherapy for lung cancer (as of today, four immunotherapies have been approved for lung cancer).  That means the 19.4% survival in 2015 doesn’t yet reflect ANY of the improved survivals from targeted therapy or immunotherapy (except some patients on Tarceva who happened to have EGFR-positive lung cancer).

Edit to add:  Lung cancer screening for high-risk groups began AFTER 2015, which means we’ll be catching more lung cancers in early stages, when they are curable.

Imagine where this curve will go by 2020! Go cancer research!

You can find the data for this chart here.

8 years in the Cancerverse

ROS1der cofounders Lisa Goldman, Janet Freeman-Daily and Tori Tomalia at the C2 Awards Ceremony in New York City May 2, 2019.

Eight years ago today, I first heard the words, “You have lung cancer.”

In 2011, I was diagnosed with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). I had traditional chemo and radiation. Once treatment ended, my cancer immediately spread to a new site. Then I learned about online patient communities, and biomarker testing for genomic alterations, and clinical trials. I had more chemo and radiation. My cancer spread again. Then I tested positive for ROS1+ NSCLC, and entered a clinical trial. Now my  cancer has been undetectable by scans for over 6.5 years thanks to research.

Eight years ago today, I first heard the words, “You have lung cancer.”

In 2011, the majority of lung cancer patients were diagnosed after the cancer had already spread, and half the patients died within a year of diagnosis. Now we have lung cancer screening for those at high-risk of lung cancer, to catch the disease in early stages when it is curable. We have new therapies that are allowing some patients to live well for 4 years or more. In 2011, the standard of care guidelines published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network for non-small cell lung cancer were updated about once every 5 years.  Now the guidelines are updated about 5 times a year to keep pace with the record number of new treatment approvals that are proving effective for an every-increasing number of patients.

Eight years ago today, I first heard the words, “You have lung cancer.”

In 2011, I had no idea what cancer advocates did. I’d never met any. As I began to feel better, I wondered why I was still alive when so many others had died. Gradually I began supporting others in online forums, telling my lung cancer story, learning about treatment options and research, and sharing my patient perspective with the lung cancer community, medical professionals, and policy makers in hopes of increasing funding, acclerating research, and improving outcomes for other lung cancer patients. Now there are dozens of other lung cancer patients and caregivers advocating as well.

Eight years ago today, I first heard the words, “You have lung cancer.”

From that singular moment of disbelief and panic, I started on a journey that has changed my priorities, and my approach to life in general.  I now focus on living life to the best of my ability (whatever my abilities might be at the moment), on what matters most to those I love, on what will make a difference for other lung cancer patients–especially those who have my rare type of cancer.

I wonder what the next 8 years will bring.

 

Take Action Today! Support restoring $20 million in lung cancer research funding

If you do nothing else today, DO THIS & PASS IT ON. Please ask your US Congressional Representative to support restoring $20M in funding for the Lung Cancer Research Program in 2020 before the March 26 sign-on deadline. It only takes a minute

https://www.votervoice.net/mobile/LCA/Campaigns/64484/Respond

Want to be a #lungcancer patient research advocate? Inaugural @IASLC STARS program application period is open!

    • Have you or a family member been diagnosed with lung cancer?
      Are you already active in providing lung cancer support and/or education to others?
      Do you want to ramp up your advocacy work and learn more about the science of lung cancer research?

    THEN …

    Apply for the brand-new STARS (Supportive Training for Advocate in Research and Science) program!  STARS was developed by the IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) in collaboration with international lung cancer patient research advocates and advocacy nonprofits.

    Those accepted in the program will be assigned a mentor from their own country, meet and learn lung cancer science from researchers, develop science communication skills, and attend the World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Barcelona, Spain in September 2019.

    To learn more and to find the online application, click here:
    https://www.iaslc.org/supportive-training-advocates-research-and-science-stars

    The application period is open from March 8 to May 1, 2019. Hope you’ll apply!

    Ah, the life of a research advocate …

    Life as a lung cancer research advocate can require a lot of travel. This week I’m in Washington DC for two meetings.

    Monday I participated as the sole patient advocate in the National Cancer Institute’s Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) working group meeting, along with some of the top US researchers in this disease. The meeting will provide fodder for the NCI’s report to Congress about the Recalcitrant Cancers Act.

    Thursday I’ll be one of several patient advocates at the National Institutes of Medicine for a meeting on data sharing, along with medical institutions, pharma, and healthcare payers. Data sharing in the electronic age involves more than just who can see your medical records. We patients and family members have already participated in several phone calls in preparation for this meeting. It will be interesting to hear what the other stakeholder groups think are the main barriers to data sharing, and what we should do about them.

    In between, I’m trying to get caught up on expense reports and writing projects while adjusting to a new time zone. I hope my inputs make a enough difference for patients to make the travel worthwhile.

    Join me for @TheALCF Lung Cancer Living Room 1/15 5:30 PM Pacific

    Please join lung cancer patients/survivors Teri Kennedy, Jeff Julian, Don Stranathan, Andy Trahan, and me, along with Dr. Amy Moore (Director of Science and Research, Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, also know as ALCF) Tuesday January 15, 2019 5:30-7:30 pm Pacific Time for a discussion on “Navigating the Latest Advances in Lung Cancer Treatment.” I’ll have an opportunity to talk about The ROS1ders and the research project we created  in partnership with ALCF.

    Join us in person in San Carlos, California, watch live on Facebook, or watch later on YouTube or in the Living Room Library.