8-Apr-2021 STAT Video Chat Event: What gene targeted therapies mean for patients with cancer

I’m excited to participate in the STAT News video chat “What gene targeted therapies mean for patients with cancer” on April 8, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT) on the topic The discussion will include a great group of speakers:

  • Bonnie J. Addario, lung cancer survivor; co-founder and board chair, GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer
  • Narjust Duma, M.D., assistant professor of medicine, thoracic oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center
  • Janet Freeman-Daily, MS, Eng, co-founder and board chair, The ROS1ders; stage IV lung cancer survivor & research advocate
  • Laura A. Petrillo, M.D., palliative care physician, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School
  • Camille Hertzka, VP, head of oncology U.S. medical, AstraZeneca (sponsor speaker)
  • Eric Boodman, general assignment reporter, STAT (moderator)

You can register for FREE at this website to view the event live:
https://marketing.statnews.com/what-gene-targeted-therapies-mean-for-patients-with-cancer

8-Apr-2021 COSMO Panel–“Patient Engagement in Social Media: When the Doctor is No Longer the Expert”

I am honored to be a presenter at the Collaboration for Outcomes using Social Media in Oncology (COSMO) online conference tomorrow, April 8.

I’m speaking in Session IV (Social Media in Oncology: A Multistakeholder Look) on a panel titled: “Patient Engagement in Social Media: When the Doctor is No Longer the Expert” at 1:40–2:20 pm Eastern Time. Registration for the two-day conference is FREE. Register here: https://lnkd.in/duYxM7e

My fellow panelists are all awesome:

Chair: Patricia F. Anderson, MILS @pfanderson
https://www.facebook.com/pfanderson

Tamika Felder @tamikafelder
https://www.facebook.com/tamikafeldercampbell

John Novack, MS @J2Novack
https://www.facebook.com/john.novack.98

Dorinda (Dee) Sparacio, MS @womenofteal
https://www.facebook.com/dsparacio

Thanks to Don S Dizon for the invite to participate!@drdonsdizon

FDA Listening Session on Molecular Subsets of NSCLC — 21-Jan-2021

The US FDA is hosting a listening session to gather patient perspectives on oncogene-driven lung cancer. Representatives from several biomarker patient groups will speak; I will be speaking on behalf of The ROS1ders. Representatives from the FDA will share ways they are addressing the concerns raised by the patients.

When: Thursday, January 21, 2:30 pm to 4 pm ET.

Where: To receive a link to the event, register free at https://fdaoce.formstack.com/forms/nsclclisteningsession

If you’re unable to attend, you can watch the recording later.

CLCC statement regarding COVID-19 vaccinations for cancer patients

See the source image

The COVID-Lung Cancer Consortium (CLCC) is a global forum comprised of experts in thoracic oncology, virology, immunology, and vaccines, in addition to representatives of patient advocacy, government, and professional organizations. They meet every other week to address issues and explore research at the intersection of COVID-19 and lung cancer.

CLCC has drafted a statement about the importance of prioritizing cancer patients for vaccination against COVID-19. Its language has been enthusiastically endorsed by leading clinicans and scientists. We hope it will encourage vaccine prioritization of patients with cancer–especially patients with lung cancer–so that vaccine doses will be made available for them should they CHOOSE to be vaccinated (after discussing risks and benefits for their individual case with their healthcare provider).

ASCO is also working to ensure that cancer patients receive priority designation in vaccine distribution plans.

CLCC Statement Regarding COVID-19 Vaccinations for Cancer Patients

Individuals with several clinical features and co-morbid conditions, including cancer, are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 disease. Of particular concern, patients with lung cancer have increased mortality rates of ~32% from COVID-19 infection, which calls for specific prevention measures. Currently, individual states have varying plans regarding prioritization of these high-risk patient populations for vaccination, with some states recommending cancer patients be vaccinated early while other states place these patients farther down the priority list. The COVID- Lung Cancer Consortium (CLCC) meets on a regular basis to monitor ongoing impacts of the pandemic on patients with lung cancer and is comprised of a global assembly of thought leaders in thoracic oncology, virology, immunology, vaccines and patient advocacy. CLCC recommends that state-level policies for vaccine administration should strongly consider a high priority for vaccination of all cancer patients and especially lung cancer patients. Thus, as more vaccine doses are made available, these patients will have early access should they choose to be vaccinated after discussion with their healthcare providers of the associated risks and benefits. Clearly, we still do not yet have enough information about the effectiveness and any additional side effects of such vaccines in cancer patients depending on their cancer type, stage, treatments, and other medical conditions. As such key information becomes available, like that from current NCI sponsored research, adjusted recommendations based on scientific knowledge can be made. Currently, the CLCC recommends specific attention to this vulnerable population(s) and close follow-up of these individuals to ensure the vaccine is effective and there are no unexpected adverse events.

Patient participation in #NACLC20 virtual lung cancer conference

The virtual 2020 IASLC North American Conference on Lung Cancer (NACLC 2020) runs October 16-17. Patients will be providing special perspectives throughout the conference.

REGISTRATION IS FREE for all patients and caregivers. Register here: https://naclc2020.iaslc.org/registration/

Check out the full program here. https://naclc2020.iaslc.org/program-at-a-glance/

Don’t miss these two presentations by lung cancer patient research advocates on Saturday, October 17th:

Ivy Horowitz Elkins and Janet Freeman-Daily on “Patient Driven Research” in the Targeted Therapy session (9:50-10:45 am CT)

Jill Libles Feldman on “Adjuvant Treatment: What Does It Mean for Patients” in the Keynote session. (11:50 am -12:40 pm CT)

Sep 21, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

 The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

—————————

As of September 18, 2020, the US has had 6.7 million cases of COVID-19, with just over 198,000 deaths. The Midwest is leading new cases, with 8 cities in Wisconsin appearing on The New York Times list of the 20 metro areas with fastest-growing cases.

With the run-up to the US Presidential election now less than two months away, recent weeks have seen a growing national dialog on the potential availability of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. In this week’s update, we want to review some basic concepts on vaccines, the clinical trials process for ensuring vaccine safety and provide an update on the current status of the various vaccine candidates currently under development.

 

What is a vaccine? How long do vaccines last?

 In the most basic terms, a vaccine is a substance that can stimulate the body’s immune response to provide protection against diseases caused by different viruses and bacteria. Some vaccines provide potentially life-long protection (measles) while others provide long-term protection but still require periodic “booster” shots (tetanus being a classic example). Still others require annual vaccination because of the nature of the virus – influenza virus (that causes “flu”) undergoes changes from year to year and so the formulation for the vaccine changes each year to accommodate these changes and offer the best protection possible.

(PSA: don’t forget to get your flu shot this year!)

 

How are vaccines tested?

Everyone feels a great sense of urgency to develop a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 so we can think about returning to some degree of “normalcy” in our daily lives. A concerted global effort is currently underway not only to develop a safe and effective vaccine but to develop other treatments as well (including so called monoclonal antibodies as well as novel antiviral treatments). In the US, the administration has developed what it refers to as “Operation Warp Speed” to try to accelerate vaccine development.

Without getting into a political debate, we want to offer a brief overview of what goes into getting a vaccine approved. Specifically, once a candidate vaccine is identified, its safety and efficacy (how well it works) must be validated through a rigorous clinical trials process as shown in the schematic below:

 

For a great overview of how vaccines are developed, the different types of vaccines, how they are tested and the status of current efforts to develop a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, we refer you to an excellent resource put together by The New York Times.

 

Vaccine Safety

Historically, the United States Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) has been responsible for regulating vaccines in the US.  Recently, the scientific integrity of both the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have come into question over fears that they may be rushing vaccine development in the interest of political expediency. Because of this concern, many of the pharmaceutical companies at the forefront of the effort to develop a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine signed an unprecedented pledge affirming their commitment to vaccine safety.

Politics aside, the scientific community must ensure any potential vaccine is both safe AND effective before it is approved and administered to the public. Past experience with the development of SARS and MERS (Middle-Eastern Respiratory Syndrome) vaccines has taught us that coronavirus vaccines need thorough testing. A recent incident that occurred during the Phase 3 clinical trial of AstraZeneca’s vaccine candidate highlights why vaccine safety is paramount. The initial lack of details about the nature of the incident raised concerns about lack of transparency by the drug companies developing these vaccines. In response to mounting pressure, several of the leading contenders have made their protocols public.

 

Hope on the Horizon

 Despite the challenges associated with developing an effective vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, there are several reasons to be hopeful:

  • The science is advancing at a historic and unprecedented pace. Previously, the fastest vaccine ever made (against mumps) took four years to develop.
  • We have access to novel vaccine development platforms and also experience with coronavirus vaccine development with SARS and MERS. Scientists are building on this pool of available knowledge to develop a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2.
  • We have gone from first identifying a novel virus (SARS-CoV-2) as the cause of COVID-19 (Dec 2019) to having the sequence of the viral genome (Jan 2020) and the pursuit of multiple, compelling vaccine efforts within the span of only six months.

 

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. National Cancer Institute website “Coronavirus: What People with Cancer Should Know
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website:
    Directory of state department of health websites
    Directory of local health department websites
  8. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers

GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer (Amy Moore, PhD – amoore@go2foundation.org)
LUNGevity Foundation (Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH – ubasuroy@lungevity.org)
Lung Cancer Foundation of America (Kim Norris – KNorris@lcfamerica.org)
Lung Cancer Research Foundation (Cristina Chin, LMSW, MPH – cchin@lcrf.org)
LungCAN (Kimberly Lester – kimberly@lungcan.org)

 

Sep 8, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

 The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

—————————

We hope that all of you had a peaceful Labor Day holiday.  This week marks the six-month anniversary of when the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic (March 11). As of September 7, 2020, cases in the US have surpassed the 6 million mark, with over 186,000 deaths.

Nationally, new cases appear to be on a decline but pockets of high COVID activity remain. The figure below shows which states have the most new daily cases and the relative degree of community spread versus containment of the virus:

 

 

PSA: Get your flu shots!

 With the arrival of September, we are strongly recommending that all eligible patients and caregivers get their annual flu shot this year! Public health experts are particularly concerned about the potential for patients to get infected with both influenza and SARS-CoV-2 this winter. Additionally, since the symptoms for these two viruses are similar, many patients experiencing flu-like symptoms may flood already overtaxed healthcare systems. Many doctors’ offices and pharmacies already have flu shots available. It’s also important to remember that it takes approximately two weeks from receiving the shot to have adequate protection. So please make a plan to get your shot as soon as possible.

Some patients, particularly those on checkpoint inhibitors, may be concerned about whether they can take the flu shot – we always recommend asking your doctor but previous studies suggest that it is safe for patients.

 

We want to hear from you!

We are interested in knowing what topics we should cover in future updates. Please share your thoughts with us by taking this short (1-2 minute) anonymous survey.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LungAdvocacy_COVID19_needs

 

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. National Cancer Institute website “Coronavirus: What People with Cancer Should Know
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website:
    Directory of state department of health websites
    Directory of local health department websites
  8. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers

GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer (Amy Moore, PhD – amoore@go2foundation.org)
LUNGevity Foundation (Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH – ubasuroy@lungevity.org)
Lung Cancer Foundation of America (Kim Norris – KNorris@lcfamerica.org)
Lung Cancer Research Foundation (Cristina Chin, LMSW, MPH – cchin@lcrf.org)
LungCAN (Kimberly Lester – kimberly@lungcan.org)

 

Aug 24, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

 The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

—————————

It has been more than 6 months since the first cases of COVID-19 hit the United States. We issued our first update on March 3, a week before the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic on March 11. As of August 24, 2020, cases in the United States continue to rise unabated, with over 5.6 million total cases and 175,000 deaths. Countries in Western Europe that had seen a decrease in case load have recently seen small outbreaks, indicating that community spread continues to be a high possibility.

So we are left to wonder: when can we resume normal activities in our lives?

The straightforward answer to that question is when we have achieved a reasonable level of herd (or community) immunity, which occurs when a high percentage of the community is immune to a disease through vaccination and/or prior illness (natural infection). Herd immunity is critical because it not only prevents the spread of infection but also protects people who may not be able to receive a vaccine (for example, the elderly or the severely immunocompromised in whom the immune system is unable to mount a protective response against the virus).

Epidemiologists are hard at work figuring out what levels of herd immunity will protect us from SARS-CoV-2. Initial models suggested that the percentage of people who need to be immune to the virus to achieve herd immunity was around 70%. However, recent research suggests a lower threshold, on the order of only 40%. It is extremely important to keep in mind that no matter the threshold of immunity required, these estimates are based on mathematical models and not true population-based studies.

Our current level of potential immunity to SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) is measured using an antibody assay that detects past exposure to the virus whether or not a person had symptoms of COVID-19. Herd immunity through natural infection may depend on location. For example, levels of herd immunity may be lower in rural areas where people are more spread out than in cities, which are more crowded. Also, older people may be more susceptible to the virus and succumb to the disease, whereas younger people may recover from infections and add to the “pool” of herd immunity. Recent research from a COVID-19 hotspot, New York City, looking at the percentage of people who are “antibody-positive” shows a huge variation within the five boroughs of the city. It is therefore possible that the harder hit areas, such as parts of Brooklyn and Queens, may be close to achieving a herd immunity threshold whereas other parts of the city may not (assuming that the antibody tests are accurate and antibodies are long-lasting). This is especially important to keep in mind because it clearly demonstrates that achieving a high percentage of immune individuals through natural infection is not an easy task and comes with a price (please refer to our past update on seropositivity from July 13, 2020).

We are interested in knowing what topics we should cover in future updates. Please share your thoughts with us by taking this short (1-2 minute) anonymous survey.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LungAdvocacy_COVID19_needs

 

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. National Cancer Institute website “Coronavirus: What People with Cancer Should Know
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website:
    Directory of state department of health websites
    Directory of local health department websites
  8. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers

GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer (Amy Moore, PhD – amoore@go2foundation.org)
LUNGevity Foundation (Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH – ubasuroy@lungevity.org)
Lung Cancer Foundation of America (Kim Norris – KNorris@lcfamerica.org)
Lung Cancer Research Foundation (Cristina Chin, LMSW, MPH – cchin@lcrf.org)
LungCAN (Kimberly Lester – kimberly@lungcan.org)

 

Aug 10, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

 The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

—————————

As of August 9, 2020, we are approaching 20 million cases of COVID-19 worldwide, with almost 5 million cases and 160,000 deaths in the US alone. In this week’s update, we want to shift our attention to another looming healthcare crisis resulting from the pandemic, namely a significant decline in new cancer diagnoses. Given the importance of maintaining appointment schedules, we will also present questions that you may want to ask your healthcare provider in advance of visits to the doctor. Finally, we will highlight ongoing advances in lung cancer research, because cancer doesn’t stop and neither do we.

 

What is the impact of COVID-19 on new cancer diagnoses?

In the early days of the pandemic here in the US, many stakeholders conducted various modeling simulations to look at the short-term and long-term impacts of the pandemic, particularly related to people continuing to get their recommended cancer screenings (mammograms, colonoscopies). These studies highlighted a looming crisis, predicting a rapid decline in the number of new cancer diagnoses. Dr. Ned Sharpless, Director of the National Cancer Institute, highlighted some of this data in a recent presentation at the AACR COVID-19 and Cancer Conference and in an editorial for Science.

This past week, a new study showed an alarming overall drop (46%) in new cancer diagnoses across six different tumor types, including lung cancer, for the period from March 1 to April 18, 2020:

Additional reports from the across the country indicate an even higher drop in new cancer diagnoses. The COVID and Cancer Research Network reported a decline of 74% across 20 sites in the US for April 2020 compared to April 2019.

While people were encouraged to delay these essential screenings during the spring, we know that early detection of cancer is critical for achieving the best outcome and so we want to stress the importance of keeping up with your medical appointments and recommended screenings. To that end, we want to empower you with a set of questions to ask your doctor in advance of any visits so that you feel they are taking appropriate precautions to ensure your safety.

 

What Should I Ask My Doctor About What They’re Doing to Keep Me Safe?

It’s not unusual to be concerned about the risk of exposure to coronavirus when you go to a clinic or hospital during a pandemic. A facility that is currently experiencing a large volume of COVID-19 patients, or limiting certain procedures or services, may have limitations on which patients it can accommodate.  However, most facilities are ready to welcome patients.

Hospital and clinic facilities are taking extra precautions to keep their patients safe. Many facilities are posting videos and information on their websites explaining which precautions they’ve implemented (here is an example video).

If you can’t find information online about the facility you want to visit, call the facility and ask about their precautions.  Here are some questions you can ask your care provider or facility before an in-person appointment:

  • Can the care provider conduct the visit via telemedicine? (This option requires a patient who doesn’t need an in-person consultation or procedure, AND who is comfortable with and has the equipment for conducting video meetings on a computer or smartphone).
  • Can prescriptions be acquired through home delivery, mail order, or curbside pick-up?
  • Does the facility require everyone to wear a face covering at all times?
  • Does the facility direct patients who have COVID-19 to specific entrances or areas to minimize contact with other patients?
  • Does the facility screen all staff for typical COVID-19 symptoms before they start their shifts?
  • Does the facility have screeners at patient entrances to ask about known COVID-19 symptoms, take each visitor’s temperature, and ensure appropriate face coverings are worn (and provided, if necessary)?
  • Does the facility limit nonessential companions for each patient to no more than a single individual who is free of known COVID-19 symptoms?
  • Does the facility promote physical distancing through use of protective barriers, markers on the floor to indicate where to stand to stay 6 feet apart, and separating seats in waiting areas?
  • Is each piece of equipment and appointment area cleaned between each use by a patient?
  • Do enclosed treatment spaces (like MRI machines) have a waiting period between patients?
  • Does the facility adhere to stringent and frequent cleaning protocols, especially in high-touch areas?
  • Does the hospital allow visitors in patient rooms? If so, does it require them to check in at a nursing station or other screening area before entering patient’s room?

Additional steps YOU can take to help keep yourself safe before, during, and after a visit inside a hospital or clinic:

  • Don a clean face covering before entering the facility, avoid touching it or your face during your time in the facility, and keep it on at all times unless a healthcare provider asks you to remove it.
  • Wash your hands frequently. Bring hand sanitizer with you (just in case)
  • Before meeting your healthcare provider, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer.
  • When you get back to your car or your home, remove the mask carefully by touching only the ear loops. Use hand sanitizer after removing your mask.
  • To be extra cautious, wash your hands and face covering and change your clothes when you get home. You might even take a shower. Wash the clothes you wore to the facility.

 

And lung cancer research continues in full swing!

This year’s World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC 2020), hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, went virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Originally scheduled to be held in Singapore from August 8-12, 2020, the scientific sessions will be available from January 28-31, 2021.

WCLC 2020 was officially kicked off on August 8, 2020 with the Presidential Symposium live telecast at 7 PM Singapore time. The Presidential Symposium is a platform to present practice-changing research in the early detection or treatment of lung cancer. This year’s Symposium had three fantastic Phase III trial presentations on immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a new targeted therapy for ALK-positive lung cancer, and immunotherapy for mesothelioma.

  1. Currently, a chemotherapy -immunotherapy (pembrolizumab) combination is prescribed as first-line treatment for NSCLC that does not have any targetable driver mutations and that does not express high levels of PD-L1 protein. This is based on the results of the KEYNOTE-189 clinical trial, and the combination is available in the United States and some Western European countries. Results from the Phase III ORIENT-11 trial conducted in China show that addition of an immunotherapy (sintilimab – a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor) to chemotherapy shows similar benefits seen in KEYNOTE-189. This is an extremely critical finding because results of the ORIENT trial will set the stage for this combination to be available in China and other Asian countries, so that patients can continue to benefit from these advances.
  2. Ensartinib is a 2nd-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Results from the Phase III eXalt3 trial comparing ensartinib to crizotinib as first-line treatment for ALK-positive lung cancer show that this 2nd generation ALK inhibitor is superior to crizotinib, in terms of its effect both on the primary lung cancer and on brain metastases. These exciting results suggest that ensartinib may be another treatment option for ALK-positive lung cancer in the first-line setting.
  3. Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive type of cancer affecting the lining of the lungs. It has been associated with exposure to asbestos. Results from the phase III CheckMate 743 trial, comparing combination immunotherapy (nivolumab-ipililumab) to chemotherapy showed that immunotherapy combo is superior to chemotherapy, in the first-line setting.

These three presentations will likely set the foundation for new drug approvals and remind us that lung cancer research will continue, no matter what COVID-19 brings!

 

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. National Cancer Institute website “Coronavirus: What People with Cancer Should Know
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website:
    Directory of state department of health websites
    Directory of local health department websites
  8. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers

GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer (Amy Moore, PhD – amoore@go2foundation.org)
LUNGevity Foundation (Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH – ubasuroy@lungevity.org)
Lung Cancer Foundation of America (Kim Norris – KNorris@lcfamerica.org)
Lung Cancer Research Foundation (Cristina Chin, LMSW, MPH – cchin@lcrf.org)
LungCAN (Kimberly Lester – kimberly@lungcan.org)

 

My 9th Cancerversary–Adapting to a changing landscape

Today is my 9-year cancerversary.

I was diagnosed in 2011 with Stage 3a NSCLC, and progressed to stage 4 after first line chemo-radiation. Progressed again after 2nd line treatment (different chemo and more radiation). Then I tested positive for ROS1, enrolled in the crizotinib clinical trial in November 2012, and have had no evidence of disease on scans ever since, with manageable side effects.

A few months after starting the clinical trial, I felt well enough to think about what’s next.  I was grateful for surviving thus far, and wanted to make a difference. In 2013 I found my purpose: I became a patient advocate, and over the years evolved into a research advocate. My time is spent on The ROS1ders (a global group of ROS1+ patients and caregivers that strives to improve outcomes for all ROS1+ cancers), the IASLC STARS program (to develop new lung cancer research advocates), collaborative cancer advocacy, and translating science for others.

Apparently living well with lung cancer and having a purpose was not enough. The ‘verse decided more character building was needed. Like everyone else, I am now learning to adapt to life during a pandemic.  The whole world is now experiencing what we metastatic lung cancer patients live every day:

  • A deadly disease with no cure
  • Cumulative, sometimes overwhelming losses
  • The fear of not knowing when death will come for you or strike someone you love.

I hope someday every ROS1+ positive cancer patient, every lung cancer patient, every cancer patient will have a cure.

I hope the world will soon have effective treatments and a vaccine for COVID-19 .

I hope our healthcare providers and systems survive the upheaval.

I hope our economy recovers swiftly.

I hope more people recognize the power and value of science, working together, and compassion for one another.

I hope I live long enough to see it.

 

Time for more kitty snuggles.