Dear Congress: Please Consider Lifetime Caps and Pre-Existing Conditions Carefully

Dear Congress:
Some voters say they don’t want the government or insurance companies to spend THEIR money on other people’s healthcare.  They think repealing the Affordable Care Act will fix all their healthcare problems.
They probably are not aware that “other people” will likely include them or someone they love at some point.  All of us risk the ravages of accidents, illness, and age, and 39% of US citizens will get cancer in their lifetimes (per the NCI’s current SEER data).
nci-seer-cancer-fact-sheet-2016-all-cancers
Before the ACA was implemented, cancer was a “pre-existing” condition that prevented anyone who’d had it from obtaining health insurance, and most healthcare plans had “lifetime caps” on how much they would spend on individuals.  My exceptionally great employer-provided health plan’s lifetime cap was $250,000 before the ACA.
My insurance company was billed more than $250,000 during my very first year of advanced lung cancer (I was diagnosed May 2011).
If the lifetime cap and pre-existing conditions clauses were in place last year, I would have lost my health insurance, and likely would have no option to buy more. I would have been responsible for paying about $98,000 in 2016 alone in billed healthcare services and treatments (assuming I could still get my targeted therapy cancer drug free through a clinical trial). That’s despite not having other major health issues last year, like hospitalization for pneumonia or cancer treatment side effects.

I know the ACA is not perfect. I applaud any effort that will improve healthcare coverage in the US.  But repealing the ACA without a suitable replacement is not going to solve our health care crisis.

If you allow pre-existing conditions and lifetime caps to be reinstated, you will be forcing an estimated 14,140,254 cancer patients to choose between bankrupting their families, or foregoing treatment (and probably dying).

One of those people will be your constituent … or even someone you love.
Please consider your healthcare options carefully.  The life you save may be your own.  A six-figure salary is peanuts compared to cancer treatment.

#CureChat 1/12: A conversation about precision medicine and clinical trials

curechat-graphic

I am honored that I was asked to be the featured guest for the #CureChat on Twitter this Thursday, January 12th, 2017 at 1 pm ET.  We’ll be talking about precision medicine and clinical trials.  You can read more about it on the Cure Forward blog.  Hope you can join us!

Chat Topics (from the Cure Forward blog):

T1. Janet Freeman-Daily’s Story (my lung cancer story, told 140 characters at a time)

T2. What does the term “precision medicine” mean to you and how does it connect to clinical trials?

T3. Tell us about the ROS1 Mutation.

T4. What were your biggest fears and misconceptions about clinical trials before finding out about them via an online community?

T5. How did it feel to be accepted into a trial? What emotions, and why? And how did you manage them?

T6. What are some of the positive aspects of clinical trials that most people don’t know about?

T7. Please share some online resources where you find trustworthy info for lung cancer and clinical trials.

You can follow the conversation in Twitter by entering “#CureChat” in the search box to filter tweets.  However, if you haven’t joined a tweetchat before, you may find the conversation easier to follow if you use a tool designed for tweetchats, such as tchat.io.  To use tchat.io, do the following:

  • Login to Twitter (you must have a Twitter account to do this)
  • Type “tchat.io” in the URL of your browser, then hit the “enter” key. The tchat.io entry page will appear.
  • Type “#CureChat” in the box that says “enter hashtag,” then left-click on the colored box that says “Start Chatting.” You will be taken to a page that has a big blank textbox at the top, and a list of recent tweets that contain the hashtag “#CureChat” below.
  • Left-click on the link just below the textbox that says “sign in.” A popup window will ask if you want to authorize tchat.io to access to your Twitter account. Left-click on the box that says “authorize app.” You will return to the tchat.io page.
  • Left-click on the link above the textbox that says “hide retweets.” This will eliminate duplicate tweets and make the conversation easier to follow.

Now you can follow the #CureChat conversation on the tchat.io page.  If you want to contribute to the conversation, type your own tweets into the textbox at the top of the page.  Tchat.io will automatically add the hashtag #CureChat to the end of your tweet so your tweet will appear in the conversation.

However you choose to follow the chat, if you want to respond or direct a question to someone in the chat, be sure to include their Twitter handle (e.g., @JFreemanDaily is my handle) at the beginning of your tweet.

Thanks to Liza Bernstein (@itsthebunk) and the Cure Forward team for inviting me to be their guest in this chat.  I look forward to seeing you on Thursday!  I will post the link to the Storify summary of the chat HERE once the Cure Forward team posts it.

 

More cancer research. More survivors. No stigma.

stigma-4

I want to see cures for ALL cancers.

In most cases, we can’t know for certain what caused an individual’s cancer, meaning we can’t determine exactly what caused their normal cells to mutate and become cancerous. Since we don’t know all the causes, we can’t PREVENT all cancers. All we can do is reduce our risk. Because we all need to eat and breathe, and our world contains toxins known and unknown, we’ve all likely done something that increases our risk of getting cancer.

Smoking is a risk factor for 14 types of cancer, and affects every organ in the body.  I support anti-tobacco campaigns to educate and hopefully prevent more people (especially young people) from consuming any tobacco product. I support compassionate smoking cessation efforts to help people find motivation to quit if they did start.  I hope people who did use tobacco (and those who love them) can forgive and move on to healthier lifestyles.

But I also recognize that tobacco is more addictive than heroin or cocaine.  According to the American Cancer Society, the best way to quit for most people is some combination of medicine, a method to change personal habits, and emotional support.  Unfortunately, many smokers who have the desire and motivation to quit lack the tools and support necessary to quit.

Humans are not perfect. Up to 90% of smokers began before age 18–when we all make risky choices for the wrong reasons–and became addicted.  But we’ve all made decisions that could put our health at risk.  I’ve made my share: pulling all-nighters to study for finals, consuming cola drinks and chocolate for energy during long hours on a tough aerospace proposal, accepting a high-stress job. I knew these weren’t the healthiest choices, but I did them anyway.  Does that mean I deserve a terminal illness?  If a world-class athlete was fatally injured while competing in the Olympics, would we shrug in acceptance because they chose a high-risk sport and thus were asking for death?

To repeat one of my catchphrases:

“Yes, it’s healthier not to smoke, but it’s not a sin that warrants the death penalty.”

Metastatic cancer has killed so many of my friends. I saw their pain, and the anguish of their loved ones, and I find I don’t care what might have caused their cancer.  I don’t want to lose any more people to this beast.

I want the allocation of research funding to reflect the science that has the best of chance of making a difference for cancers that kill people: metastatic cancers.  I want everyone to receive effective treatment for ANY cancer they may have, regardless of why they have the disease, or where they live, or how old they are, or what insurance they have.

Would you want someone to decide whether you deserve healthcare based on YOUR past actions or choices?

End stigma. All cancer patients deserve compassion.

First-ever NCI Facebook Live for Lung Cancer Awareness Month 11/17 8 pm ET

cxzquw0xaaaibeb

Hope you will join the lung cancer community tomorrow 11/17 at 8pm Eastern for the first-ever Lung Cancer Awareness Month Facebook Live event with the National Cancer Institute and the concurrent Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) Chat on Twitter. We’ll be talking about immunotherapy and lung cancer clinical trials.

For more information, check out the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) Chat blog post for their 11/17/2016 chat.

 

Involving ROS1-Positive Cancer Patients in ROS1 Research

Hey ROS1ers: This is an IMPORTANT REQUEST!

We all want to find a CURE for our disease, right?

To do this, we need to know how many patients are willing and able to participate in research for cancer driven by ROS1 mutations. The results will hopefully motivate more patients to join us, generate more interest in collaborative ROS1 research, and attract more funding to ROS1 research.

PLEASE COMPLETE THIS BRIEF 10-QUESTION POLL AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. Just click on the link below to get started! It only takes about 5 minutes. Results of the poll will be posted on the ROS1cancer website, and the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation (ALCF) ROS1 website.

SurveyMonkey Poll: Patient Interest in ROS1 Cancer Research

patients-banding-together-for-research

AND …

If you haven’t already, please complete the ROS1 patient survey on the ALCF ROS1 website. We need more responses–COMPLETE responses (all questions answered)–to have statistically valid data. It’s a long survey (might require an hour), but the length is necessary to accomplish its goals. The survey examines ROS1 patients’ diagnosis and treatment journey, family cancer history, patient exposure to toxic environments and materials, and other factors that might have contributed to the development of ROS1 cancer. A poster about the survey was presented at the IASLC Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium In Thoracic Oncology in September 2016. The preliminary results of the survey will be presented at the IASLC World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna in early December 2016.

Four years on a cancer clinical trial, and still NED–yay for research and hope!

Four years ago today, I took my first dose of crizotinib in a clinical trial for patients who had ROS1-positive lung cancer. My first scan–and every scan thereafter, including this past Monday 10/31– has shown no evidence of disease (NED). Not bad for a metastatic lung cancer patient who previously progressed on two separate lines of combined chemo and radiation.

I’m very grateful for cancer research and the availability of clinical trials. We’ve had more new drugs approved in the past five years than in the previous five decades!

During November, which is Lung Cancer Awareness Month (#LCAM on Twitter), please consider donating to your favorite lung cancer research facility (one option is the Lung Cancer Colorado Fund at the University of Colorado) or a lung cancer advocacy organization that supports research. 

And for a bit of hope, check out the NEW LCAM website, which represents a partnership among 19 lung cancer advocacy organizations led by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

 
lcam-multi-color-logo

HOPE LIVES! More research. More survivors.

Cancer Choices: Quality of Life versus Quantity

Life has an odd way of reinforcing its lessons.

Due to my own lung cancer journey, I’ve learned a lot about the uncertainties of cancer diagnostic procedures and treatment. I’ve learned that cancer is sneaky; sometimes it doesn’t announce itself until it is in advanced stages, doesn’t behave as expected, doesn’t present a clear diagnosis with a “best” treatment option. And I’ve learned the value of making treatment choices that allow the patient to do what matters most to them, rather than prolonging life at any cost. For many patients, qualify of life is more important than quantity of days.

Recently, life gave me the opportunity to apply my hard-won wisdom to my beloved 14-year-old cat, General Nuisance.

General is a fluffy, snuggly ball of love. He has been MY cat since … Read more

img_1484