Nominate a CURE #LungCancer Hero by June 30, 2021

Show your appreciation for an individual who goes above and beyond to make a difference in the lives of those affected by lung cancer. If you know a hero who has inspired change, exemplified compassion or brought newfound hope to you or someone you care for, share their story by submitting an essay nomination for the 2021 Lung Cancer Heroes® awards. This is only the second year this award has been offered.

Submit your nomination by June 30, 2021 here: https://event.curetoday.com/event/d49340bf-0224-4cb0-974c-9ad4633de436/

10 years with lung cancer. Grateful for the ride.

Exactly 10 years ago today, I was diagnosed with lung cancer.

It’s been a wild ride thus far. When I was diagnosed in 2011, the majority of lung cancer patients died within a year of diagnosis. I was considered curable, so I had chemotherapy combined with radiation. My cancer grew immediately when I stopped treatment. I had more chemo, followed by more radiation, but again my cancer grew immediately after I stopped treatment. You can read more details about my cancer ups and downs elsewhere on this blog, so I’ll keep the history brief. The upside is that I learned about clinical trials and biomarker testing from patients in online lung cancer communities, got my tissue tested for biomarkers, and joined a clinical trial for ROS1+ cancer.

I’ve been on the same oral cancer treatment (a targeted therapy pill) for over eight years with no sign of cancer on my scans.

I’ve run the gamut of emotions over those 10 years. Some days I felt horrible physically and/or emotionally. A very few moments, I felt hopeless.

Today, however, the predominant feeling is gratitude. Gratitude for the healthcare providers who took care of me. Gratitude for more time for life with family and friends. Gratitude that I was able to watch my son mature and build an independent life. Gratitude that I was diagnosed during a revolution in lung cancer research that generated new treatments, measurably increased lung cancer survival, and gave me a relatively normal life despite metastatic lung cancer. Gratitude for the growing community of lung cancer patients and advocates, and the deep friendships formed therein. Gratitude that I’ve found a new calling as a cancer research advocate.

Especially, I feel gratitude that I have been able to make a difference in the lives of other patients in those 10 years. My current focus is on supporting two programs I cofounded: the IASLC STARS program (which helps lung cancer patient advocates evolve into research advocates), and The ROS1ders (a nonprofit that aims to improve outcomes for ROS1+ cancer patients like me).

If you want to help me celebrate surviving 10 years, please consider donating to The ROS1ders. You’ll be helping me in my research advocacy work, as well as helping find better treatments and care for my cancer. I truly appreciate any support you can give. Just click here: Janet’s fundraiser for The ROS1ders

Exactly 10 years ago today, I was diagnosed with lung cancer. Today I’m going to walk in the sun and revel in the life blooming all around me. My lease on life is renewed yet again. I’ll hold on and ride it as long as it lasts.

Image credits:
Rollercoaster: © Helioshammer | Dreamstime.comRoller Coaster Photo
Scrabble image: public domain
Flowers: Janet Freeman-Daily

Patient participation in #NACLC20 virtual lung cancer conference

The virtual 2020 IASLC North American Conference on Lung Cancer (NACLC 2020) runs October 16-17. Patients will be providing special perspectives throughout the conference.

REGISTRATION IS FREE for all patients and caregivers. Register here: https://naclc2020.iaslc.org/registration/

Check out the full program here. https://naclc2020.iaslc.org/program-at-a-glance/

Don’t miss these two presentations by lung cancer patient research advocates on Saturday, October 17th:

Ivy Horowitz Elkins and Janet Freeman-Daily on “Patient Driven Research” in the Targeted Therapy session (9:50-10:45 am CT)

Jill Libles Feldman on “Adjuvant Treatment: What Does It Mean for Patients” in the Keynote session. (11:50 am -12:40 pm CT)

June 1, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

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This past week marked a grim milestone in the United States, as we officially surpassed 100,000 deaths from COVID-19. Our groups continue to recommend that the lung cancer community adhere to best practices to limit exposure, including wearing masks/face coverings when out in public, frequent handwashing, ongoing social distancing, and limiting non-essential travel.

Normally at this time, representatives from our respective organizations would be in Chicago for the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, for which over 40,000 oncology professionals gather to share best practices in clinical oncology research and academic and community practice. In light of the ongoing pandemic, ASCO 2020 was held as a virtual conference.

Note: There are many exciting updates and recent FDA drug approvals in the lung cancer space. These are being shared via other channels through our respective organizations and will not be covered here since our goal is to focus exclusively on relevant COVID-19 updates for the lung cancer community.

In this week’s update, we will cover three topics:

  1. COVID-19 presentations from ASCO 2020
  2. Advocacy groups participate in IASLC “Lung Cancer Considered” podcast
  3. Advocacy groups collecting data for AACR COVID-19 and Cancer conference

 

COVID-19 presentations from ASCO 2020

Previous reports have suggested that lung cancer patients infected with COVID-19 have worse outcomes.  During ASCO 2020, we heard updates from two different registry efforts focused on tracking cancer patient outcomes:

  1. The COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) registry is tracking outcomes across all cancer types. The major finding from this study is that patients with actively progressing cancer were five times more likely to die within 30 days of diagnosis with COVID-19 compared to patients who were in remission or had no evidence of disease. As ASCO President Dr. Howard A. Burris III states, “For people with cancer, the impact of COVID-19 is especially severe, whether they have been exposed to the virus or not. Patients with cancer are typically older adults, often with other underlying conditions, and their immune systems may be suppressed by the cancer, or due to chemotherapy, radiation, or other treatment.” These data are consistent with previous early reports and suggest that patients with active cancer are uniquely vulnerable and face worse outcomes upon infection with the virus that causes COVID-19.
  2. A second registry effort, Thoracic cancERs international coVid 19 cOLlaboraTion (TERAVOLT), is specifically tracking outcomes for lung cancer patients infected with COVID-19. For this study, 400 patients were included in the analysis, the majority of which had stage IV cancer. Among this cohort, 141 patients died from COVID-19, with 334 of the patients requiring hospitalization. Those patients receiving chemotherapy, either alone or in combination, within three months of a diagnosis of COVID-19 fared the worst, with a significantly increased risk of dying (64%) compared to those who did not receive chemotherapy.

Take home message from these studies: COVID-19 presents a unique threat to all cancer patients, especially those with lung cancer. Various international efforts are underway to understand these risks and what it means for patients and their cancer care. As states continue to reopen, it is important not to let your guard down and to maintain all the precautions you have been taking over the past few months. This virus has not gone away and it is important that you and your loved ones take appropriate steps to minimize exposure.

 

Advocacy groups participate in IASLC “Lung Cancer Considered” podcast

Authors of these weekly updates, including Dr. Jan Baranski, Janet Freeman-Daily, Dr. Amy Moore, and Dr. Upal Basu Roy recently participated in the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) “Lung Cancer Considered” podcast. They were joined by Jill Feldman, Dr. Alice Berger, Dr. Christine Lovly, and Dr. Brendon Stiles to discuss impacts of COVID-19 on lung cancer research. Despite the obstacles created by the pandemic, lung cancer research marches on and we think you will be encouraged and inspired by the discussion. Listen here.

 

Advocacy groups collecting data for AACR COVID-19 and Cancer conference

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on cancer care, AACR is convening a special conference focused on the presentation of emerging data in basic, clinical, and epidemiologic research related to COVID-19 and cancer. Lung cancer patients are especially vulnerable to developing a serious case of COVID-19. In order to provide the community accurate, up-to-date, and curated scientific information on COVID-19 and cancer, lung cancer patient advocacy groups have come together to support our community through joint advocacy updates.

We need your help and your perspective!
We are inviting you to participate in this 10-minute survey to capture your concerns about COVID-19, and whether you found this collaboration and the updates useful. The survey will close at midnight Pacific Daylight Time, Friday, June 5, 2020 to allow us to prepare abstracts for submission to the AACR “COVID-19 and Cancer” virtual meeting.

You can also copy and paste this link on your web browser to take the survey.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LC_JT_Updates

The data we collect from the survey will also be shared openly across all advocacy groups once the conference is completed. Thank you for your help and for providing us your perspective.

 

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. The National Cancer Institute has a special website for COVID-19 and emergency preparedness. COVID-19: What People with Cancer Should Know-
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website.
    • Directory of state department of health websites
    • Directory of local health department websites
  1. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers.

Join me for @TheALCF Lung Cancer Living Room 1/15 5:30 PM Pacific

Please join lung cancer patients/survivors Teri Kennedy, Jeff Julian, Don Stranathan, Andy Trahan, and me, along with Dr. Amy Moore (Director of Science and Research, Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, also know as ALCF) Tuesday January 15, 2019 5:30-7:30 pm Pacific Time for a discussion on “Navigating the Latest Advances in Lung Cancer Treatment.” I’ll have an opportunity to talk about The ROS1ders and the research project we created  in partnership with ALCF.

Join us in person in San Carlos, California, watch live on Facebook, or watch later on YouTube or in the Living Room Library.

 

My #WCLC2018 Presentations

I’ll be attending the annual World Conference on Lung Cancer (#WCLC2018) in Toronto Canada later this month.  For those who are interested, I will be making two presentations.  Hope I’ll see you in the audience!

OA10 – Right Patient, Right Target & Right Drug – Novel Treatments and Research Partnerships
Tuesday 9/25 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Oral Abstract Session in the Targeted Therapy Track
Moderated by Howard (Jack) West, Jyoti Patel

ES05 – Collaboration Between Stakeholders to Improve Lung Cancer Research 
Tuesday 9/25 15:15 PM to 16:45 PM
Education Session in Advocacy Track
Moderated by Bonnie Addario, Toshiyuki Sawa

An opportunity to support patient-driven ROS1 cancer research

I hope you’ll support me and the Global ROS1 Initiative as we strive to accelerate research, find better treatments and hopefully cure ROS1 positive (ROS1+) cancer — which I have. Here’s a National Cancer Institute blog about the Initiative. This project is very dear to me.

If you’ve been meaning to contribute, or you have friends or family you’ve been meaning to ask to donate, do it today, or sometime before the end of the year!  The recently-signed US tax law revisions may affect whether you can claim a tax deduction for your charitable contributions after January 1, 2018.

GO TO MY FUNDRAISER BY CLICKING HERE:
Janet Freeman-Daily’s ROS1 Research Fundraiser

Thanks for supporting ROS1+ cancer research—you could help save someone’s life someday. For those who want more detail about the project and fundraiser, read on!

Why research ROS1 Cancer?

My type of cancer is driven by an alteration in the ROS1 gene. Medical research has made it possible for me to live well with aggressive, metastatic ROS1+ lung cancer since 2011. However, ROS1+ cancer is uncommon (only 1%-2% of lung and other cancers) and not well understood. Only one approved ROS1-targeted drug exists, and patients eventually develop resistance to it. Little is known about how this disease begins, progresses and develops resistance to treatment.

Is my donation tax-deductible?

This fundraiser directs funds to the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation (ALCF), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit (view their Guidestar page); monies are placed in an ALCF account designated for our ROS1 project. Donations  are tax deductible under US tax laws.

What is the Global ROS1 Initiative?

I helped to create the Global ROS1 Initiative, a unique collaboration between ROS1+ patients, caregivers, researchers, clinicians, and industry. This is the first-ever effort initiated by patients to focus on cancer driven by a single genomic alteration anywhere in the body. We are initially funding projects in the US (takes time to learn about international research collaboration), but our patient group is global, with patients in 19 countries to date.

How did the Global ROS1 Initiative get started?

Who are the Global ROS1 Initiative partners?

What research will the Global ROS1 Initiative fund?

Funds in the ROS1-designated account will be distributed by a panel of Global ROS1 Initiative representatives (including patients) to our projects. We are funding two projects at present:

  • A survey conducted through Stanford University, which collects personal and health history data on ROS1ders. Researchers will study the data to look for possible causes of ROS1+ cancer, and evaluate effectiveness and sequence of treatment options.
  • The ROS1 Cancer Model project, which is creating new models of ROS1+ cancer for drug development and research into our disease. In early 2017, only a few ROS1+ models existed, and they did not represent all the dozens of variations of ROS1+ cancer. In this project, we ROS1ders agree to donate our cancer tumor cells collected in the normal course of care to create cell lines and mouse models that researchers can use to study our disease.

How will the Global ROS1 Initiative accelerate research?

As part of our patient-driven approach, we aim to make our data and models widely available to the cancer research community instead of holding it in silos at individual institutions.  We will be creating a biorepository of our specimens with annotated patient data, including making use of patient registries (like the Lung Cancer Registry) that share de-identified data will validated researchers. The cancer models we create will be distributed at minimal cost to researchers.

The ROS1ders also help spread vetted information about ROS1+ cancers to patients, caregivers, and the public.  We donate our time to maintain and write content for the ros1cancer.com website  which shares up-to-date information about ROS1+ cancer, names of ROS1+ experts, known treatments and their approval status globally, and available clinical trials focused on ROS1+ cancers.  We also administer a private Facebook group in which ROS1+ patients and caregivers share their experiences, news about our cancer, and tips for living with our disease (more info on joining this group is here).

The start of something big …

I’m excited to be one of the handful of patients speaking in a public forum tomorrow evening at The Broad Institute in Boston, Massachusetts (well, technically, Cambridge). We’ll be sharing our “Lessons for Creating Patient­‐Researcher Partnerships to Accelerate Biomedical Progress.” I get to talk about the founding of the ROS1ders and the Global ROS1 Initiative.

A host of engaged patients, cancer researchers, and other healthcare types, among them the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the Biden Cancer Initiative (which grew out of the Cancer Moonshot) will be there. This could be the start of something BIG. At a minimum, it will spontaneously generate a HUGE group hug with advocate friends old and new.

Coincidentally, we’ll be staying at a hotel just a few blocks from my old MIT dorm during MIT Reunion Weekend.  I’ll be too late for reunion festivities–attending the ASCO Annual Meeting last week took priority.  Still, I’ll wander over on my knee scooter (still healing after foot surgery) in the 90º-plus heat.  I ought to be able to reflect on my crazy undergrad days on Third East in the East Campus dormitory for at least five minutes before seeking refuge inside an air-conditioned building.  Next year I plan to indulge in my 40th MIT Reunion–I didn’t expect to live long enough to see it, and I’m going to take full advantage of the the opportunity!

NCI Features the ROS1ders on its CCG Blog

Today the National Cancer Institute published this blog about the ROS1ders on the Center for Cancer Genomics “Insights and Innovations” blog.  The Global ROS1 Initiative is underway!  I’m glad I was able to help share our story.
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ROS1+ Cancer Patients Partner to Increase Research

May 23, 2017, by Janet Freeman-Daily, MS, Eng

In May 2015, I met four friends in a bar near Washington, D.C., to talk about not dying of cancer.

This conversation planted a seed that has grown into The Global ROS1 Initiative, a patient-researcher partnership that is redefining research into ROS1-positive (ROS1+) cancer. The Initiative includes a group of over 150 patients in 19 countries; two patient-focused foundations, Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation (ALCF) and Addario Lung Cancer Medical Institute (ALCMI); academic cancer researchers; and industry. The Initiative includes more than twice the number of patients enrolled in any ROS1 clinical trial thus far.

How did this happen? Let’s return to the bar. Read More …

Six years with lung cancer: finding the meaning

I was eating a typical breakfast this morning, at our typical time, in the typical place, when I realized today was not typical.  Today is my six-year cancerversary.

Took me a moment to digest that thought.

Considering how shocked I was to hear my diagnosis of advanced lung cancer on May 10, 2011, I’m surprised this day seems typical.  Perhaps I shouldn’t be.  I’ve been living with No Evidence of Disease for 52 months and counting (thanks to a clinical trial, medical research, and other patients), and my scans only happen twice a year.  I might almost ignore the fact that I’m still a cancer patient in active treatment if not for the persistent side effects of previous treatment, daily medication ritual (seven different meds for cancer and side effects), and occasional bouts of pneumonia and coughing.

My time with lung cancer has been eased by the wonderful friends I’ve made along the way in the lung cancer community.  Some of my favorite experiences are watching them discover how to combine their passion for changing lung cancer outcomes with their unique skills and interests to meet a need.  Whatever skills they may value and enjoy, they can use them to find a purpose that gives meaning beyond a lung cancer diagnosis. Maybe it’s making memories with family and friends, creating a blog or piece of art, supporting newly-diagnosed patients and their caregivers in person or online, telling their lung cancer story in public, volunteering for a lung cancer advocacy organization, writing to lawmakers, conducting a fundraiser, or serving as a research patient advocate.  The needs in the lung cancer community are huge, and there are many ways to make a difference.  A caring act need not be global to be great. And the funny thing is, when you’re caring for others, one’s own issues seem smaller and more manageable.

Since my diagnosis, I’ve gone through this discovery process.  I found a way to combine skills I enjoy using (for me, it’s learning and communicating about science) with my passion to improve lung cancer outcomes for myself and others.  I’m making a difference in the world doing something that I love.

My evolution happened in phases, punctuated by seemingly random events that invited me into the next phase:

  1. Cancer Patient (May 2011)– I did what the doctor told me.
    (I moved to the next phase when my cancer became metastatic and I realized no one knew how to cure me. I had to be my own advocate.)
  2. Engaged Patient (October 2011)– I learned about my disease from online forums and other patients, actively discussed treatment options with my medical team, and shared my experience with other patients.
    (I moved to the next phase as I realized that sharing my lung cancer experiences was useful to others, and that perhaps I could do more.)
  3. Patient Advocate (April 2012)– I shared my story and patient perspective in increasingly more public venues, and began to work with advocacy groups.
    (I moved to the next phase as I realized I had accumulated more knowledge about treating lung cancer than some doctors I encountered.)
  4. Expert Patient (June 2013?)– I read new lung cancer research, discussed it with knowledgeable medical experts, and shared what I’d learned with other patients and carers.
    (I moved to the next phase as I discovered opportunities for sharing my story, knowledge and skills with healthcare, legislative, and policy making professionals through conferences, advocacy organizations, and online portals.)
  5. Patient Activist (October 2013)– I began actively pushing for changes in funding, public policy, and the healthcare system regarding lung cancer.
    (I moved to the next phase as I made contacts within the broader lung cancer community and saw opportunities for collaborations.)
  6. Research Partner and Activist (September 2015)–I now work with patients, caregivers, clinicians, researchers, pharma, advocacy groups and policy makers to improve lung cancer outcomes, and help other patients and caregivers in their explorations of advocacy.

As I’ve evolved, I’ve found purpose.  This purpose gives me focus, and helps me think myself as something more than just a lung cancer patient.  I get up most days knowing I have something useful to do, no matter how I feel physically.

I would not say cancer gifted me with this purpose.  The challenges of cancer only forced me to reassess what matters most by confronting me with a foreshortened lifespan and loss of abilities.  We all must deal with some level of adversity in life.  It’s how we handle that adversity that defines us.  I truly believe the Native American proverb:  “The soul would have no rainbow if the eyes had no tears.”

I’m not just surviving with cancer, I’m living.  I’m fulfilling a purpose, for as long as I can, however long I may have.

Here’s to finding the meaning.