June 29, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

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As of June 28, 2020, the United States has reported more than 2.5 million cases of COVID-19 and 125,484 deaths. We are now seeing a rapid escalation in cases in states across the US. Some would argue that these increases simply reflect more testing but that only tells part of the story. Perhaps a more meaningful metric is the rate of new hospitalizations and ICU bed capacity. Seven states (AZ, AR, CA, NC, SC, TN, TX) are now reporting their highest hospitalization rates since the pandemic started. In hard-hit Houston, TX, ICU bed occupancy stands at 97% at Texas Medical Center. Though only a quarter of that number is currently due to COVID-19 cases, there is once again growing concern about the ability of our hospitals to handle the rapidly increasing number of patients, especially once a second wave of infections strikes.

There are also some changing demographics with this most recent uptick in cases, including growing numbers among young adults ages 20-30. While that may seem to be good news at first, since younger people for the most part have a less severe form of the disease than the elderly or those with underlying comorbidities, this also creates a potential reservoir of the virus that could rapidly extend to more vulnerable populations in the surrounding community.

In the absence of a vaccine or an effective treatment, our best modes of protection remain continued social distancing, frequent handwashing, and wearing masks or facial coverings. This paper from The Lancet supports the use of face masks in reducing transmission in both the healthcare and community setting. The lack of a spike in cases related to recent national protests also suggests that masks played a large role in preventing transmission of the virus. As cases continue to rise across the country, more and more states are beginning to mandate the use of masks or facial coverings, as shown below:  

 

Additional studies on outcomes, antibody response, and radiological findings: 

  1. In our June 15, 2020 update, we presented findings from the TERAVOLT study, which has reported an increased mortality rate (33%) in lung cancer patients with COVID-19. Some have questioned this study’s findings and how translatable they are to the situation here in the US. New data from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in NYC were reported for a cohort of 102 patients with both lung cancer and COVID-19. Of these patients, 62% were hospitalized and 25% died. Of the patients who required ICU level care (21%), 72% died. However, COVID-19 severity appeared to correlate more with patient-specific factors rather than tumor-specific characteristics or treatments. Thus, while this is a small study, it does reinforce the vulnerability of lung cancer patients to COVID-19. Another study from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center looked at a cohort of 423 cancer patients with COVID-19 (8% of which were lung cancer patients) and found that 20% developed severe respiratory illness (including 9% who required mechanical ventilation) and 12% died within 30 days. In addition, the authors found that administration of immunotherapy was associated with a higher risk of complications. Despite small sample size of patients from single institutions and from different countries, all these studies reinforce two points: cancer patients may be at a higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19 and various patient- (such as lung damage from radiation therapy) and treatment-specific (immunosuppressive treatments such as chemotherapy) factors determine the extent of severity.
  1. New research out of China suggests that the antibody response (a measure of immunity) to SARS-CoV-2 infection may not last as long as for other respiratory viruses, particularly among asymptomatic patients. The study, published in Nature Medicine, suggests that antibody levels fall off by over by 70% in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients by 8 weeks following infection. Though the sample size is small, if true, these results have important implications for establishing “herd immunity” (also sometimes referred to as community immunity) through natural infection as well as vaccination efforts.
  1. Additionally, the paper above described radiological imaging findings in the lungs of asymptomatic patients, including ground-glass opacities as shown below. Coupled with prior reports of extreme lung damage in some patients (including a healthy 20 year old woman who required a double-lung transplant), these data, though from a small cohort of patients, affirm that there is still much we do not know yet about COVID-19’s impacts and if infection has a lasting impact on lung function in patients who recover. In the case of lung cancer, the overlap between radiological findings in COVID-19 and lung cancer complicates diagnosis, treatment and management of patients.

In light of these studies and others which suggest an increased risk for patients with lung cancer, researchers from the fields of lung cancer, virology, immunology and epidemiology are rapidly mobilizing to create large-scale programs to address questions such as:

  • What is the relative risk of COVID-19 for lung cancer patients?
  • How many lung cancer patients have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 and have antibodies against the virus?
  • What are the features of the immune response to SARS-CoV-2?
  • What are the long-term implications for lung cancer patients who recover from COVID-19?

In summary, we continue to advise our community to maintain public health precautions as they go about their daily activities such as household chores and groceries. In a recent New York Times article, former director of CDC (under the Obama administration), Dr. Tom Frieden says, “Start with the three Ws: wear a mask, wash your hands, and watch your distance.” Now more than three months into the pandemic, hospitals and clinics have excellent procedures in place to ensure that patients are kept safe during clinic appointments. We strongly advise lung cancer patients to check with their doctors on what these precautions are, in case they are concerned about getting exposed to SARS-CoV-2 while seeking healthcare. It is not advisable to miss clinic appointments without consulting your healthcare team.

 

AACR Virtual Conferences

Lung cancer patient advocates attended AACR’s Virtual Annual Meeting II on June 22-24. As expected, many presentations focused on the intersection of COVID-19 and cancer as well as our current national dialog on racial issues. Dr. Lisa Newman presented work on the double hit minority cancer patients are facing as a result of the ongoing pandemic. Dr. Ned Sharpless, Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), reported data predicting an additional 10K cancer deaths over the next decade as a result of missed screenings, delays in diagnosis and reductions in cancer care. Though these models were for breast and colorectal cancer, there is equal concern about the potential impacts on lung cancer. The lung cancer advocacy groups must continue to push forward policies that protect minority communities and ensure access to continued screening and care during the current crisis.

Thank you to everyone who participated in our recent survey to collect data on the value of these updates and patient concerns that have emerged as a result. We are pleased to report that we have had two abstracts accepted for presentation at the upcoming AACR Virtual Meeting: COVID-19 and Cancer being held July 22-24. Our community will be well-represented as we learn even more about the intersection of these two diseases and the implications for lung cancer in particular.

 

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. The National Cancer Institute has a special website for COVID-19 and emergency preparedness. COVID-19: What People with Cancer Should Know-
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website: Directory of state department of health websites, Directory of local health department websites
  8. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers

GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer (Amy Moore, PhD – amoore@go2foundation.org)
LUNGevity Foundation (Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH – ubasuroy@lungevity.org)
Lung Cancer Foundation of America (Kim Norris – KNorris@lcfamerica.org)
Lung Cancer Research Foundation (Cristina Chin, LMSW, MPH – cchin@lcrf.org)
LungCAN (Kimberly Lester – kimberly@lungcan.org)

 

#Cancer patient vs unmasked worker in the era of #COVID19

This morning (Saturday) I had to ship scan CDs overnight from Washington state to my cancer doc in Colorado for my virtual appointment on Tuesday. Don’t fret, it’s routine follow-up–I’m not attending in person because I do not want to fly during a pandemic.

When I entered the UPS store, neither employee behind the counter was wearing a mask. Masks are required in Washington State as of yesterday, due to increasing cases of COVID-19.

When I politley asked the clerk serving me to put on a mask, he emphatically stated, “No, I’m not going to do it.” And stared at me.

Wow.

I needed to send the package ASAP, so I proceeded anyway.

I told the clerk I was sending medical records to my cancer doctor in another state because I don’t feel safe flying during this pandemic. I said needed them to arrive on Monday for my virtual medical appointment on Tuesday. He processed my package efficiently, but told me he couldn’t guarantee on time delivery due to COVID-19. Fingers crossed that it arrives on time.

I debated whether to say anything more about the mask. Despite being a somewhat outspoken patient advocate, I usually won’t make waves over customer service snafus that cost me a minimal amount of money–I have other ways to spend my time that will make more of a difference in the world. In this case, however, I decided the possibility of helping someone come to realize how masks help prevent the spread of COVID-19 was worth the effort.

When our business was done, I thanked the clerk, and (to acknowledge his viewpoint) said I understood he had a right not to wear a mask, that it can be inconvenient or uncomfortable. I then said if he wore a mask, he would help protect people like me, who are in the high-risk group for severe COVID-19. He looked at me and said simply OK. Then he called for the next customer.

I thought that’s all one can do in real time.

I posted about this incident on Facebook, and learned a number of my friends (many of them also in the high-risk group for COVID-19 due to age, health conditions, or both) had encountered hostility from unmasked workers in places of business. The suggestions my friends offered got me thinking about additional actions to address the issue of the unmasked during a pandemic.

I believe the science and data shows wearing a mask DOES help protect others and reduce the spread of the virus. I want more people to accept that they should wear a mask, even though it may be inconvenient or uncomfortable.  Pressure from employers may change minds when compassion can’t.

However, I think confronting and/or intimidating the unmasked is not particularly safe–some people feel quite strongly about this topic, and will aggressively defend their “right” not to wear one. Besides potential verbal unpleasantness and bodily harm, confrontation may also generate shouting, which will only spread virus droplets further. If the individual does not respond to a respectful request, I think leaving the establishment is the safer route.

But I can continue to press after I get home. UPS will be hearing from me. Which leads me to the approach I’ve decided to take.

RESOLVED:
When being served during the COVID-19 pandemic by an unmasked (or improperly masked) person at a place of business, I will do the following:

  1. Calmly tell the person I would appreciate them wearing a mask to protect me (a person at high risk of severe COVID-19). If they are wearing a mask but it’s not properly positioned to cover both the mouth and nose, I will ask them to position the mask properly. If they don’t comply, I won’t press further.
  2. After I’ve left the establishment, I will contact the store’s manager and remind them if they want customers to come in, they must respect customer requests to be protected from infection.  If applicable government regulations require wearing a mask, I will remind the manager of this.
  3. If the store is a franchise, I’ll repeat #2 with corporate headquarters via phone, email and/or Twitter (many businesses scan Twitter to catch posts that could generate bad public relations).
  4. If applicable government regulations require wearing masks, I will contact the appropriate health department to report the health violation.

Applying pressure through employers increases the chances that the unmasked will start wearing masks in public. I encourage you to participate in this!

Please share in the comments what approach worked for you.  Please remember to keep yourself safe — avoid escalation!

Thanks to everyone who responded to my Facebook post on this subject for their great suggestions!

A bad day in research advocacy …

The eight-hour virtual cancer research conference started at 5:45 AM

AND

The livefeed repeatedly crashed

AND

A researcher mansplained how to handle the survey that you just helped design

AND

A conference presenter says the targeted therapy cancer drug that is keeping you alive is too costly, and chemo (which didn’t work for you) is just as effective

AND

Someone in your international lung cancer patient support group dies for lack of access to drug that is standard of care in your country

AND

A local friend gets diagnosed with metastatic lung cancer

AND

A friend of another friend gets diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer.

 

I hate cancer. I need chocolate.

June 15, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

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As of June 12, 2020, the United States has reported more than 2 million cases of COVID-19 and 113,914 have died from this disease. States are in different phases of reopening and shelter-in-place restrictions and lockdown have been eased in almost every state in the USA. With restrictions being lifted despite the upsurge in new cases, a big question remains.

Is it safe to return to routine activities? The short answer to this question is NO – we are not yet ready to return to routine activities.

In this week’s update, we provide evidence on why the lung cancer community needs to be vigilant about the risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. We also describe the impact of easing shelter-in-place restrictions in different states in the US and conclude by providing expert guidance from epidemiologists on what to expect over the next year.

  1. Lung cancer patients are at higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19: The Thoracic cancERs international coVid 19 cOLlaboraTion (TERAVOLT) registry study is specifically tracking outcomes for lung cancer patients infected with COVID-19. Recently published data from this study suggests that stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are at higher risk of complications and mortality if they get infected with SARS-CoV-2. Of the patients included in the study, 33% succumbed to complications from COVID-19. Though the data generated for this study is primarily from European countries, it is highly probable the findings will hold true in other high-income countries such as the United States. Though the study does not provide information on the outcomes of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients, we anticipate that the findings will hold true for SCLC as well, given the high symptom burden of SCLC. Also, the TERAVOLT study has identified smoking history as an important predictor of developing complications from COVID-19. This suggests that SCLC patients may be at higher risk of a severe form of COVID-19, given the association of SCLC with active tobacco exposure. It is important to keep in mind that the CDC considers patients with lung co-morbidities (such as lung cancer) to be at a higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19.
  1. Easing shelter-in-place restrictions has led to an escalation in new COVID-19 cases in the United States: It is now proven that public health measures such as home isolation, business closures, and other large-scale social distancing measures have had large and measurable health benefits in containing the spread of COVID-19 and “flattening the curve”, as described by a recent research study in the journal Nature. Therefore, before lifting or removing these restrictions, there needs to be careful deliberation taking into account the local case load of COVID-19 and availability of critical hospital resources, should there be a spike in cases when restrictions are lifted. In order to assist states in reopening, the CDC has suggested a phased-approach to easing shelter-in-place restrictions. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that we will need to monitor reopening with caution and continue to maintain public health precautions.
    • The state of Florida reported a spike in COVID-19 cases since the state entered phase 2 reopening on June 5th. The 64 counties that moved into the second phase of reopening saw a near 42% increase in new cases the week before that could not be explained by increased testing alone.
    • The state of Arizona has seen a huge spike in the number of COVID-19 cases since the state eased restrictions at the end of May. Arizona’s Department of Health Services has reported that the state has already reached 80% of its ICU bed capacity.

If you are curious to see how your state is performing in light of the recent lifting of shelter-in-place restrictions, please check out this article.

  1. We should continue to maintain public health measures to minimize exposure to SARS-CoV-2: Easing shelter-in-place restrictions does not mean we should stop maintaining public health precautions. We highly recommend that everyone:
    • Wear masks in public. A recent publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows wearing masks is protective, given that transmission of the virus through air is one of the primary means of infection.
    • Continue to maintain six feet distance from others in public
    • Continue to practice social distancing
    • Self-quarantine in case you suspect you may have been exposed to the virus
    • Wash your hands regularly with soap and water
    • Avoid touching your face
    • Avoid large gatherings of people
    • Minimize all non-essential travel

As a lung cancer patient or caregiver, if you have any questions on how to maintain public health measures as you run errands and go to work, please check out the CDC resources here. We are also learning about the long-term effects of an infection. Impact of COVID-19 on the body can last for several months. In some extreme cases, damage to the lungs is severe enough to require a double-lung transplant. We therefore firmly believe that it’s better to be safe than sorry!

  1. Epidemiologists suggest that the timeline for resuming different activities will be determined by the availability of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2: In a recent article in the New York Times, 511 epidemiologists were asked to rate how soon they would resume different activities. Below are the results of this opinion Though this data is not meant to serve as guidelines for the general public, it gives us a picture of where expert opinion lies with regard to when to resume normal activities.

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. The National Cancer Institute has a special website for COVID-19 and emergency preparedness. COVID-19: What People with Cancer Should Know-
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website: Directory of state department of health websites, Directory of local health department websites
  8. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers

GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer (Amy Moore, PhD – amoore@go2foundation.org)
LUNGevity Foundation (Upal Basu Roy, PhD, MPH – ubasuroy@lungevity.org)
Lung Cancer Foundation of America (Kim Norris – KNorris@lcfamerica.org)
Lung Cancer Research Foundation (Cristina Chin, LMSW, MPH – cchin@lcrf.org)
LungCAN (Kimberly Lester – kimberly@lungcan.org)

 

June 1, 2020 Update to the Joint Statement on #Coronavirus #COVID19 From #LungCancer Advocacy Groups

The post below is shared with permission. It can also be found on the websites of the lung cancer advocacy organizations listed at the end of this blog post.

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This past week marked a grim milestone in the United States, as we officially surpassed 100,000 deaths from COVID-19. Our groups continue to recommend that the lung cancer community adhere to best practices to limit exposure, including wearing masks/face coverings when out in public, frequent handwashing, ongoing social distancing, and limiting non-essential travel.

Normally at this time, representatives from our respective organizations would be in Chicago for the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, for which over 40,000 oncology professionals gather to share best practices in clinical oncology research and academic and community practice. In light of the ongoing pandemic, ASCO 2020 was held as a virtual conference.

Note: There are many exciting updates and recent FDA drug approvals in the lung cancer space. These are being shared via other channels through our respective organizations and will not be covered here since our goal is to focus exclusively on relevant COVID-19 updates for the lung cancer community.

In this week’s update, we will cover three topics:

  1. COVID-19 presentations from ASCO 2020
  2. Advocacy groups participate in IASLC “Lung Cancer Considered” podcast
  3. Advocacy groups collecting data for AACR COVID-19 and Cancer conference

 

COVID-19 presentations from ASCO 2020

Previous reports have suggested that lung cancer patients infected with COVID-19 have worse outcomes.  During ASCO 2020, we heard updates from two different registry efforts focused on tracking cancer patient outcomes:

  1. The COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) registry is tracking outcomes across all cancer types. The major finding from this study is that patients with actively progressing cancer were five times more likely to die within 30 days of diagnosis with COVID-19 compared to patients who were in remission or had no evidence of disease. As ASCO President Dr. Howard A. Burris III states, “For people with cancer, the impact of COVID-19 is especially severe, whether they have been exposed to the virus or not. Patients with cancer are typically older adults, often with other underlying conditions, and their immune systems may be suppressed by the cancer, or due to chemotherapy, radiation, or other treatment.” These data are consistent with previous early reports and suggest that patients with active cancer are uniquely vulnerable and face worse outcomes upon infection with the virus that causes COVID-19.
  2. A second registry effort, Thoracic cancERs international coVid 19 cOLlaboraTion (TERAVOLT), is specifically tracking outcomes for lung cancer patients infected with COVID-19. For this study, 400 patients were included in the analysis, the majority of which had stage IV cancer. Among this cohort, 141 patients died from COVID-19, with 334 of the patients requiring hospitalization. Those patients receiving chemotherapy, either alone or in combination, within three months of a diagnosis of COVID-19 fared the worst, with a significantly increased risk of dying (64%) compared to those who did not receive chemotherapy.

Take home message from these studies: COVID-19 presents a unique threat to all cancer patients, especially those with lung cancer. Various international efforts are underway to understand these risks and what it means for patients and their cancer care. As states continue to reopen, it is important not to let your guard down and to maintain all the precautions you have been taking over the past few months. This virus has not gone away and it is important that you and your loved ones take appropriate steps to minimize exposure.

 

Advocacy groups participate in IASLC “Lung Cancer Considered” podcast

Authors of these weekly updates, including Dr. Jan Baranski, Janet Freeman-Daily, Dr. Amy Moore, and Dr. Upal Basu Roy recently participated in the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) “Lung Cancer Considered” podcast. They were joined by Jill Feldman, Dr. Alice Berger, Dr. Christine Lovly, and Dr. Brendon Stiles to discuss impacts of COVID-19 on lung cancer research. Despite the obstacles created by the pandemic, lung cancer research marches on and we think you will be encouraged and inspired by the discussion. Listen here.

 

Advocacy groups collecting data for AACR COVID-19 and Cancer conference

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on cancer care, AACR is convening a special conference focused on the presentation of emerging data in basic, clinical, and epidemiologic research related to COVID-19 and cancer. Lung cancer patients are especially vulnerable to developing a serious case of COVID-19. In order to provide the community accurate, up-to-date, and curated scientific information on COVID-19 and cancer, lung cancer patient advocacy groups have come together to support our community through joint advocacy updates.

We need your help and your perspective!
We are inviting you to participate in this 10-minute survey to capture your concerns about COVID-19, and whether you found this collaboration and the updates useful. The survey will close at midnight Pacific Daylight Time, Friday, June 5, 2020 to allow us to prepare abstracts for submission to the AACR “COVID-19 and Cancer” virtual meeting.

You can also copy and paste this link on your web browser to take the survey.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LC_JT_Updates

The data we collect from the survey will also be shared openly across all advocacy groups once the conference is completed. Thank you for your help and for providing us your perspective.

 

Resources and websites:

  1. IASLC’s Guide to COVID-19 and Lung Cancer
  2. The National Cancer Institute has a special website for COVID-19 and emergency preparedness. COVID-19: What People with Cancer Should Know-
  3. We are following updates provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  4. Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Resource Center
  5. Interactive map of US COVID-19 cases by state
  6. The One-Two Punch: Cancer And COVID-19 (an important perspective for cancer patients)
  7. You can find information specific to your state or city or town on your health department’s website.
    • Directory of state department of health websites
    • Directory of local health department websites
  1. American Medical Association resources for healthcare providers.