Be the Change


The USA is being sorely tested.  Now is the time to show the power of our Constitutional form of goverment.

Regardless of whether I voted for an incoming US President, I believe in our election system and the US tradition of a peaceful transition of power. That tradition deserves respect. Not all nations give their citizens that option.

If our government and its systems have flaws, then state your objections and use our participatory system of government to fix it. Don’t use rage and violence to make your point–that will not erase hatred or make any positive, lasting change.

People, you can do more than exercise your Constitutional right to peaceful protest.  Remember also to exercise your right to pursue lawful change as laid out by the US and State Constitutions.

Along the way, teach compassion and respect by showing them to others.  Show the world why a Constitutional form of government is desirable.  BE THE CHANGE.

Dear Congress: Please Consider Lifetime Caps and Pre-Existing Conditions Carefully

Dear Congress:
Some voters say they don’t want the government or insurance companies to spend THEIR money on other people’s healthcare.  They think repealing the Affordable Care Act will fix all their healthcare problems.
They probably are not aware that “other people” will likely include them or someone they love at some point.  All of us risk the ravages of accidents, illness, and age, and 39% of US citizens will get cancer in their lifetimes (per the NCI’s current SEER data).
Before the ACA was implemented, cancer was a “pre-existing” condition that prevented anyone who’d had it from obtaining health insurance, and most healthcare plans had “lifetime caps” on how much they would spend on individuals.  My exceptionally great employer-provided health plan’s lifetime cap was $250,000 before the ACA.
My insurance company was billed more than $250,000 during my very first year of advanced lung cancer (I was diagnosed May 2011).
If the lifetime cap and pre-existing conditions clauses were in place last year, I would have lost my health insurance, and likely would have no option to buy more. I would have been responsible for paying about $98,000 in 2016 alone in billed healthcare services and treatments (assuming I could still get my targeted therapy cancer drug free through a clinical trial). That’s despite not having other major health issues last year, like hospitalization for pneumonia or cancer treatment side effects.

I know the ACA is not perfect. I applaud any effort that will improve healthcare coverage in the US.  But repealing the ACA without a suitable replacement is not going to solve our health care crisis.

If you allow pre-existing conditions and lifetime caps to be reinstated, you will be forcing an estimated 14,140,254 cancer patients to choose between bankrupting their families, or foregoing treatment (and probably dying).

One of those people will be your constituent … or even someone you love.
Please consider your healthcare options carefully.  The life you save may be your own.  A six-figure salary is peanuts compared to cancer treatment.

#CureChat 1/12: A conversation about precision medicine and clinical trials


I am honored that I was asked to be the featured guest for the #CureChat on Twitter this Thursday, January 12th, 2017 at 1 pm ET.  We’ll be talking about precision medicine and clinical trials.  You can read more about it on the Cure Forward blog.  Hope you can join us!

Chat Topics (from the Cure Forward blog):

T1. Janet Freeman-Daily’s Story (my lung cancer story, told 140 characters at a time)

T2. What does the term “precision medicine” mean to you and how does it connect to clinical trials?

T3. Tell us about the ROS1 Mutation.

T4. What were your biggest fears and misconceptions about clinical trials before finding out about them via an online community?

T5. How did it feel to be accepted into a trial? What emotions, and why? And how did you manage them?

T6. What are some of the positive aspects of clinical trials that most people don’t know about?

T7. Please share some online resources where you find trustworthy info for lung cancer and clinical trials.

You can follow the conversation in Twitter by entering “#CureChat” in the search box to filter tweets.  However, if you haven’t joined a tweetchat before, you may find the conversation easier to follow if you use a tool designed for tweetchats, such as  To use, do the following:

  • Login to Twitter (you must have a Twitter account to do this)
  • Type “” in the URL of your browser, then hit the “enter” key. The entry page will appear.
  • Type “#CureChat” in the box that says “enter hashtag,” then left-click on the colored box that says “Start Chatting.” You will be taken to a page that has a big blank textbox at the top, and a list of recent tweets that contain the hashtag “#CureChat” below.
  • Left-click on the link just below the textbox that says “sign in.” A popup window will ask if you want to authorize to access to your Twitter account. Left-click on the box that says “authorize app.” You will return to the page.
  • Left-click on the link above the textbox that says “hide retweets.” This will eliminate duplicate tweets and make the conversation easier to follow.

Now you can follow the #CureChat conversation on the page.  If you want to contribute to the conversation, type your own tweets into the textbox at the top of the page. will automatically add the hashtag #CureChat to the end of your tweet so your tweet will appear in the conversation.

However you choose to follow the chat, if you want to respond or direct a question to someone in the chat, be sure to include their Twitter handle (e.g., @JFreemanDaily is my handle) at the beginning of your tweet.

Thanks to Liza Bernstein (@itsthebunk) and the Cure Forward team for inviting me to be their guest in this chat.  I look forward to seeing you on Thursday!  I will post the link to the Storify summary of the chat HERE once the Cure Forward team posts it.