Mantras of the Cancer Revolution

Here’s an inspiring and hopeful talk about finding cancer treatments.

Targeted therapies are revolutionizing the way cancer is treated. One of the leaders of this revolution is Dr. Ross Camidge, Director, Thoracic Oncology Clinical Program at University of Colorado Hospital. He recently gave a talk to Colorado State University’s biotech students, using examples of his lung cancer research to inspire the students to careers in biomedical science.

CSU Career Center’s BioTech Connect: Ross Camidge

RECAP — Mantras of the Cancer Revolution:

The revolution in cancer treatment happened when the effectiveness of crizotinib for ALK+ lung cancer was discovered. “The whole drug development industry in cancer changed overnight. It wasn’t about finding one drug that was going to work a little bit in everybody. It was about findiing a drug that worked amazingly well in a small number of people.”

Camidge stated the following “mantras of the cancer revolution”:

1. One size does not fit all
(personalize cancer treatment based on each individual’s cancer)

2. Don’t walk away from a good thing
(if the targeted drug is working, stay on it as long as possible)

3. If the cancer moves, follow it
(if the cancer moves into brain, make a drug to treat the brain)

4. Question everything

Disclosure: Dr. Camidge is my clinical trial oncologist. I feel incredibly blessed to have him leading my lung cancer team.

#LCSM Chat Preview March 13 – Stress, Anxiety and Lung Cancer: How Do You Cope?

The post below is reblogged with permission from the LCSM website.

Patients and caregivers experience considerable stress and anxiety as a result of lung cancer diagnosis and treatment. How do you handle stress? Is it possible to prevent stress or is it ‘just a part of life’?  Some individuals handle stress and anxiety better than others. We want to explore this topic in more detail during this week’s #LCSM chat.

T1: What kinds of stress do lung cancer patients experience due to their cancer diagnosis or treatment?

 T2: What can healthcare providers do to help reduce stress for a lung cancer patient or caregiver?

 T3: What can patients and caregivers do to help reduce stress for themselves and each other?

Our guest for this chat will be Dr. Niki Barr, (@nikibarrphd), a Dallas, Texas, based psychotherapist who specializes in working with cancer patients and their families and teaches them how to “move through the continual challenges of cancer with emotional wellbeing”.

We know this is a very sensitive subject and we don’t expect anyone to share his or her most personal stories in such an open forum.  So we are offering an opportunity for you to submit questions to Dr. Barr in a confidential setting.  If you have a question you’d like answered or addressed during the chat, please email us at lcsmchat@gmail.com.  Only those of us associated with #LCSM Chat will be privy to the contents of the email. We will then forward the questions to Dr. Barr for possible use during the chat. Please note that if we use your question, we won’t use your name. 

 Please join us Thursday, March 13, 7 CT/8 ET, for an in-depth conversation about stress and anxiety associated with a lung cancer diagnosis. 

Thoughts or questions? Email us directly at lcsmchat@gmail.com, leave a note on our blog or send us a direct message on Twitter, @lcsmchat.